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ground. >> susie: i'm susie gharb. the u.s. stock markeis expeed to be the world's best performer in 2013. that's the prediction of john rogers of the c.f.a. institute. he joins us tonight. >> tom: and new rules for health care also are around the corner. tonight, we look at how small businesses are preparing for the changes. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there's no deal, but the two sides are still talking. house speaker john boehner and president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts thatake up the clf take efft, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst. her commentary on the markets today was dead on. >> so far, they trust that we would not be so stupid as to go over a cliff. >> reporter: but pelosi made clear what everyone knows-- time is running out t
>>> that's it for us. >>> that's it for us. thanks for watching. "early start" begins now. >>> without warning, a surprise tornado strikes in the middle of a series of severe storms throughout the southeast. >>> plus, secret sabotage. police want to know who's behind the pipe bombs found attached to the gas tank of a large truck. >>> mum's the word on the air force's secret space plan set to blast off today. secret but we have some details. >> we know all about it. >> good that's right. good morning and welcome to "early start," everyone, i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. tuesday, december 11th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. we begin this morning in the south where more storms are expected today. this after residents are left cleaning up from the aftermath of yesterday's storms. the rain was so intense. take a look at what happened to the home of one man, this is birmingham, alabama as he was being interviewed by a local tv reporter. >> we had dogs. he was in the cage. oh, my god. oh, my god. oh, my god. you all okay? you all okay? you all all right? >> look at that,
declining 12.3%. liz: because of the chicago mercantile exchange. a buying opportunity. and michael tells us why he expects double-digit earnings growth in the new year in what that'll do for equities. jerry leavy at the cme. another was some erosion of the last couple of minutes, the last hour or two. headlines from president obama, john boehner. is this market a little overbought going at the end of the year? >> for my technical perspective, you're absolutely right. they have eclipsed the upper end, and overbought situation. from my perspective and my colleagues, we are shocked trying to figure out the market moving higher. a lot of it is trying to figure out, we know a deal will get done, the real question is what are the ramifications of the deal and how will that affect earnings. as a guy who follows earnings very closely, we see that the drop year-over-year. it was from government. a noted state tax receipts are down adjusted for inflation 1% from 2,082,012. earnings are down on the top line, where does the bigger earnings growth come from? david: we have manufacturing coming in saying
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
in the next couple of days or the very beginning of next week for us to have engineered our way to a solution. >> reporter: the fiscal cliff is really a negotiation between two men, and one of them today was not sounding very happy. house speaker john boehner brought out the charts to make his case. >> here we are at the eleventh hour, and the president still isn't serious about dealing with this issue right here. it's this issue-- spending. >> reporter: the president left his spokesman to respond that republicans were pushing a plan of fantasy economics that raised more revenues while also cutting taxes on the wealthy. >> what spending cuts have the republicans put forward? the proposal that we've seen is a two-page letter, and the much- discussed second proposal is less than half a page. there is no specificity behind what the republicans have put forward. >> reporter: right now, the risk is rising that we will avoid the fiscal cliff, but end up with what some call a worst case outcome. >> we get some sort of hoaky deal that's put together with gimmicks and baseline adjustments and all that
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar ste
, roger altman and barry knapp. we have thorsten heins joining us, as well. >> our big story of the morning, it could be a tense days for the markets as the resolution to the physical cliff appears less likely. we can see the futures opening at least 150 off if things keep up the way they are. house speaker john boehner failing to mount enough support for his plan b that would raise taxes only on families earning more than $1 million. the president vowing he will press ahead with congress to get a deal done. >> he wasn't going to do it, anyway. what does he mean it will press ahead? >> i don't know. >> because it wasn't going to go to the senate. >> but to me, the demonstration that boehner didn't have the support -- you thought boehner never had the support for this plan? >> no. i'm saying boehner didn't have support to do it even at a million -- >> which suggests to me what kind of rationale -- >> because maybe the house wanted some actually spending cuts. after giving in on tax breaks, they didn't go -- >> we always wondered if boehner can deliver the right. i wonder if th
in snow. she shows us the tricks she used to survive and how she managed to escape. >>> and we asked, is it real or is it fake? that video of an eagle snatching up a baby, blowing up so fast. grabbing more than 16 million views in two days. it worked. but, yes, it's a hoax. this morning, we go straight to the source to learn the secrets of how they did it. >>> good morning, america. hi to robin at home. great to have elizabeth vargas back. paula faris in today. i'm surrounded. this is great. >> george's angels. >> that's right. >> and by the way, i knew it was a hoax. i knew that eagle wasn't grabbing that baby. >>> we have a lot to get to today. including the fiscal cliff showdown. talks have broken down. house republicans are going to push a fallback plan today. they're trying to make sure that taxes don't go up for anyone making under $1 million. will it help or hurt the negotiations? >>> and president obama front and center on the gun control debate, promising yesterday quick action. we'll show you how some cities are arming teachers. while many parents are taking safety in
it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
should do in the northeast so that those airports today could really be used for longer distance travel. and that we use those that made the most sense which was rail in those corridors. that would garner us our expectation is pretty close to $5 billion in revenue a year, with about a billion plus or minus coming out of that in terms of profit. >> so you cannot do a direct correlation between california's high-speed rail and northeast corridor? they are two completely -- >> not here. excuse me. i don't know if your question is done. we can't, ma i can't draw that conclusion here because you don't have the right data sets. we may have some folks that have an analysis come and i can look at the and get you an answer back spent perfect. thank you. mr. hanna. >> thank you, chairman. hi, how are you. nice to have you here. advisory commission, you're in the process of developing several other reports analyzing the pressure that would be taken off, projected pressure off of airlines, off of roads and what that means to the northeast will that report be done and what we we be able to get out o
for us? >> well, on the fiscal cliff, i wish it were different, but it certainly is beginning to shape up like, in the end, the democrats will be able to step back and say we raised taxes on rich people and the republicans will take credit for cutting programs. and it looks like it will go into january, unfortunately. the market doesn't seem to care. >> all the big deal, boehner and obama tried to do last year, still have to do that, simpson boles-type thing. >> by what the secretary of the treasury said yesterday. >> right. >> thank you for being here. >> bromance. a lot of fun. make sure you join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street" live from the new york stock exchange, i'm carl kin ten nia with melissa lee, cramer and neighborer are off today but we are joined by dennis. good morning to you dennis, thanks for coming in. futures today, a lot to deal with as you probably know. the fiscal cliff headline watch continues. you just heard john kanas say the market not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent dat
's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is presidential historian, ted widmer has selected the most compelling and important recordings then wrote annotations to put them into context. also ellen fitzpatrick professor of history at the university of new hampshire. also frequent contributor to our forum. tom putnam the outstanding director to bring energy to
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
undercarriage. but spain and the undercarriage is not something any of us need. but i think that howard dean, we didn't have time to go back and get howard and stuff. but howard said the best deal the democrats are going to get is to go over the fiscal cliff. taxes go up, then you go the republicans in position where they're getting the lower taxes. then patti murray. >> i just hope that people are paying attention that what we are seeing is basically the best world for politicians, they put off the and then everybody is going to pretend, oh, it's something happened. and nobody in the meantime is representing the interest of the american people. you know, we've got both parties in a position to negotiate this is what we want, this is what we elected and they're doing everything they can to not pay attention to that and to go to their separate corners and to be separate and to pretend that their way is not the only way. >> and it could result in people being called into, like, their supervisor's offices and their supervisor goes, i'm sorry, people are actually losing jobs because of this. >> but
of hillary clinton's security advisory board. thank you both for joining us this evening. >> thanks for having us on. >> eliot: steve let me start with you. after the way the president had reinforced susan rice, not only saying an attack on her is an attack on me at a press conference, the scripted applause and his statements about her at a cabinet meeting just recently, this seems like such a sharp u-turn and you heard me say a few moments ago seems as though the president caved. am i wrong about that? what do you understand to be going on here? >> well, i think it was. i think susan described it accurately. she's a very capable and competent woman who would have, i think done a great job as secretary of state. that said, it is a distraction. it has been a distraction. when jonathan karl asked the president what he thought of john mccain and lindsey graham's comments, i actually happened to be hosting the meeting that that happened at, it started a spark and you had a number of senators, john barossi was one susan
. we have more on the life of the singer jenni rivera. what can you tell us? >> good morning. she sold 50 million records, won two billboard music awards and was a star of her reality show and served as a judge on a popular talent show in mexico. hard-working until the end. she performed the last concert saturday night in monterey, mexico, hours before dying in a plane crash on her way to yet another commitment. [ speaking spanish ] they call her diva. and for anyone who ever saw her on stage, it was easy to see why. she sang heartwrenching song that's spoke to the common woman, especially mexican-americans. >> translator: every song, every lyric i'm thinking of them and how i can relate to them. >> reporter: jenni rivera was born in long beach, california to mexican parents, their story of humble origins. with an interview in cnn, she spoke about how she sold records at a los angeles flea market and how the family expected cans for the meager income they could bring in selling the metal. >> translator: it is very flattering when they tell me i'm a great artist, a great entertainer. bu
cooperman, he's going to join us on set starting at 7:00 eastern time. then at 8:00 eastern, we have black op co-founder and ceo ralph schlosstein. and lynn hutchins will join us. we'll talk about what they see playing out and what they think is working when it comes to the markets now. >> the bill that the president says is in the house that he will sign if -- that's in the senate -- >> the senate. >> the senate that he will sign if the house passes it is what? >> that is $. >> -- that is 250? >> 250? >> he said 400. he said, i have the pen, let's keep tax rates where they are for everyone at 250 and below. so this one, that's c these guys are pretty clever because that would keep rates where they are for everyone at a million and below. no middle-class taxpayers up to a million dollars -- >> that's no matter what, isn't it, in either bill? >>yon r -- i think it would be the same in either one. that's not -- what reid and i guess pelosi, you saw that, said she opposes the million-dollar thing. a lot of people if back on what they say. the difference would be that one is 250 and below, and
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointing fingers, when we went after jimi was the newt speaker and jim was forced out of office. they went after newt. that is one of the things that started this movement. over time, i think it has become political as well as personal. much more political and personal. >> she said raising cain, are -- you will the the gavel for the oversight committee and use that to raise the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and secretary as secretary -- hilary as secretary of state do not like me very much. i was chair of the government oversight committee during the time we were investigating whitewater and we were investigating campaign contributions that came from sources outside the united states and from various people. there was an awful lot to that. we had people testifying like ohnny chonung, they had contributed money to gai
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
the boston tea party. it is clear the colonists were pulling together. maybe they did not intend to use it. that was a debate. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies, unless it was officialese -- officially sanctioned. as soon as the colonies and found out about the prohibiting of ammunition from being sent to the colonies, in new hampshire and rhode island, the militia took over the force and took the ammunition, so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 -- 1774. >> kevin phillips suggests 1775 was the critical launching point of the revolutionary war and american independence. sunday night at 8:00. >> next, george will talked about the relationship between religion and american politics. he is introduced by john danforth. this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divin
] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a difference to us. when i think about what makes a successful of the law school, having a diverse, inclusive and collaborative community about standing -- outstanding students, faculty, alumni, and friends, gives us -- the members here come and there are several, very supportive a lawns, professors, this community can come together and really make a difference. and you all matter in so many ways, so want to thank all of you. i can't name you all, but you really help make us successful. now, when justice ginsburg agreed to, she said don't want to give a lecture, but i would like a fireside chat. and i said that would be lovely. and then gave myself a challenging assignment of coming up with a plan for our conversation. it was easy to know where to start, which is what a pioneer you have been, and many people here forget that in the 1950s there were very few women in law school. if you might start by reminding those who remember, and helping to enlighten those who don't, what that was like. >> in those ancient days, i began law school
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing d
instruction in the use of oils. when the civil war began, harper's commissioned the artist to depict life at the front. roving behind the lines with the potomac army, homer produced a series of closelybserved studies of camp life. homer's paintings of this period have an anecdotal or literary quality in keeping with the traditions of magazine illustration, but he also places new emphasis on pictorial design and the purely visual character of a scene-- qualities typical of the photographs of mathew brady and others. like the photographers of the civil war, whose equipment made action scenes impossible, homer preferred static group formations, and yet the feeling of directness in recording the ordinary lends to his work a special force. prisoners from the front, with its profound sense of the resignation, exhaustion, and human cost of war, evoked the admiration of both critics and the public and brought homer his first recognition as an artist. paris, december 1866. homer arrived for an extended visit and to see prisoners from the front and another of his civil war paintings that had been s
of light, we give you thanks for giving us another day, as this chamber lies silent, we pray for joy, hope, and love within the homes of the members of the people's house. send us your spirit so that there might be peace on earth, good will among all men and women. all that is done this day be for your great honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the share will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the us us house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on december 21, 2012, at 4:04 p.m. th
can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the original tea party and tea party movement were about. far from being patriots, the original tea partyers were smugglers. some of them, among the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a
that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate to take apart our common sense to interrogate what we think we know to demystify, demythologize, move beyond the cliche about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of the forefathers especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is totally different story, the grounded benevolence, the life of joseph p. kennedy was an antique from house which if i looked at it long enough to reflect back to me often in pc and in distinct distorted form images of the events of people and places which organize and a range the story of 20th century america. >> as a historian i'm interested to tell you that the origin is of this book he introduced me to the kennedy family [inaudible] jean kennedy and investors that for the first time i was finishing up my first book and in my first biography i have used a treasure trove of materials that jean kennedy smith's daughter who is writing a collection was compiling a letters from her father to france and uncles had put me onto a
, but the regime surrounded it completely cutting us off from the world, nothing was allowed in and out. even water and bread was cut off. today we obtained dough. >> reporter: they were able to open a bakery around 1:00 p.m., and the rockets struck just hours later. as nearby hospitals quickly filled up, activists began pleading for help. >> we are joined by the reporter from beirut. this looks crazy. it looks crazy to me. do we know who is responsible for this? >> reporter: suzanne, it is absolutely horrific, and just so many grizzly details started to emerge in the hours after the attack. now, the residents in that town that we spoke with said that they believed they were targeted because that town had been liberated by the free syrian army because there's a lot of anti-regime sentiment there. they believe they were targeted deliberately by the syrian regime. syria's government, however, today posted a statement on their syrian news agency website in which they blamed this on the actions of terrorists. that's the terminology they use for rebel fighters, opposition fighters in syria. they say tha
easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique funhouse mirror which if i looked at it long enough would reflect back to me, often in hazy, indistinct, distorted forms, images of events, people, places which organized and arranged told the story of 20th century america. as a historian, i'm interested in origin, so i will tell you about the origin of this book. i was a colleague of arthur schlessinger or at the city university of new york. he introduced me to the kennedy family at a -- some event, i don't know what it was, a reception, a dinn
was absolutely fascinating. a good word to use if you don't know if a felon or a hero was fascinating is that it wants to do a biography. by that a year later, i saw jean kennedy smith again. she approached me and wanted me to do it, to write that biography. they recognize there is a need for such a biography. i said well, i'm in the mid-of writing another book by andrew carnegie. she said when he went to to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. i said i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day, we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if nav corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in ses
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